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The Women's March 2017

January 30, 2017 0 Comments

Happy Monday, everyone!
Two weeks ago, millions of people came together all over the world to march for equality, diversity, and inclusion.  Instead of a one-day event, the Women's March has became a movement!  And one for the history books too! We should be proud! We were lucky enough to have two beautiful beings to tell us about their experience marching in DC and LA.  

Like many people on this day, Frances woke up from her nap on the metro with a horrible feeling.  What would normally be a pleasant and exciting ride to Washington DC, a place she holds special in her heart, was a long depressing one.  Because it wasn’t just a normal trip and it wasn’t just a normal day.  It was January 20th, 2017.  Inauguration Day.

 

It is time for even our young women to rise and be involved in this movement and raise awareness among their peers. Their voices are valuable. Meet my niece Natalie who was at the march with both her parents and her brother at the Women's March LA. // The Future IS Female 💥 I may only be 15 years old, but I already know what I want to see for our future. We all deserve respect and to be given our rights. It's my generation's time to think for ourselves and how we want our lives to play out. So, I'll take this fight- for women, LGBT, people of color, people with disabilities, of all different religions, etc. One day at a time.- @natsie.rose #girlpower 💥#makecollectives #womensmarchLA #thefutureisfemale #feminist

A photo posted by Kat Engel / Team MAKE (@makecollectives) on

 

The next day Frances and her friends rode the metro to the start of the Women’s March.  The metro was over crowded and while some may think that this would lead to a stressful and uncomfortable ride, it actually meant the opposite. Everyone was there for the same reason, to march. It was like the march already started inside the metro.  Haley who went to the march in LA said, “As we got closer to Silver Lake, the amount of people outside started to grow not only were there more people outside, but most of them were holding large poster boards and signs saying things like, Rights are Human Rights to the People Even at this point, in our car, stuck in traffic in LA - the positive, powerful energy in the air was definitely starting to build!”

When Frances stepped outside she was electrified with the image of an infinite sea of people with signs chanting for the rights of all.  It was like the world embraced her in a well needed hug.  Haley said, “The energy once we reached the actual march was indescribable could feel everyone’s strong, determined energy and it fueled the fire of inspiration in everyone who was there.” 

 

All types of people were there, men, women, children, everybody; not just female activists. Frances met a bright, intelligent young girl from Kentucky at the march with her mother.  She couldn’t help but think that if girls like her exist, that we are going to be alright.  It might have been surprising seeing so many children marching, but even the younger generation knows what is happening.  Rowan Blanchard who represented her generation at the Women’s March said in her speech, “My generation, who I am so honored to stand representing right now knows exactly what’s going on despite what many adults tells us.”  Many people don’t give the younger generation credit or a voice.  But at the march everyone was heard.  Men were carrying their young sons and marching.  Little boys were running around carrying signs.  Frances also saw older woman marching and it inspired her since they were part of a generation who first fought for women’s rights.  

There was a sense of community at the march that was so caring and inclusive.  People held doors for each other and took pictures.  Frances compared it to ‘one big block party.’  Haley also expresses the heavy sense of community saying, “I walked through the streets of downtown LA, side by side with thousands of other people, all of them with smiles on their faces, signs in their hands and words of strength, dignity and courage coming from their mouth, and so many with tears coming from their eyes.”
 
 
Frances said she will never forget standing in front of the White House, as she watched the world come together in front of her eyes. And while the Women’s March might have been the largest protest against any president ever, even people in different continents showed their support, it wasn’t just about him.  It was about human rights, inclusion, equality, and so many other issues.
Frances says what truly makes America great is its diversity and the people’s resilience.  At the age of 6, Frances and her family moved from the islands of the Philippines to America for opportunity and the American Dream.  For her protecting diversity and encouraging inclusiveness is essential.  As a Yelp Sales Recruiter in New York she does just that.  Frances hires diverse groups of people and creates an inclusive environment that is welcoming to all. She believes that, “inclusion is the right way.”

 

The march gave her the confidence that we will rise.  And we already have, Saturday gave exposure of injustices and inequalities to people who might not face injustices in their everyday life that they are happening.  It also showed the younger generation that it’s okay to stand up for your rights, and that you should.  She hopes that it gives the young girls and boys the courage to advocate for what is right. She says, “Human beings are human brings.  There is no difference.”  Also to tell the world to not mess with a woman because she has sisters all over the world who will back her up.  Girl power is a real thing.

 

 

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Written by Bree Castillo